OS2.TXT Driver File Contents (ncr40-2.zip)

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			OS2.TXT
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INSTALLATION GUIDE FOR THE SDMS 8XX OS/2 DRIVER V4.01



This file describes the features and use of the Symbios Logic SDMS 
device driver for the OS/2 operating system environment. It is divided 
into the following sections:

Introduction
   Features of the SDMS OS/2 Driver
   Description of the SDMS OS/2 Driver
Installing Your SDMS OS/2 Driver
   Command Line Options
   Troubleshooting




******************** Introduction ***********************


The OS/2 operating systems version 3.0 and later provide 
an integrated platform featuring a graphical windowing 
interface, called Presentation Manager, that allows 
simultaneous viewing of multiple applications. 
Multitasking is also supported, enabling several different 
programs to run at the same time in different windows. 
Presentation Manager allows the user to switch between 
programs, start other programs, and maintain files and 
directories. These versions of OS/2 require an 80386 or 
higher microprocessor. Other hardware requirements include 
a minimum of 4 megabytes of RAM (8 megabytes or more is 
recommended) and a minimum hard disk drive size of 40 
megabytes. Symbios Logic SDMS provides the necessary SCSI 
device driver for OS/2. We recommend reviewing the OS/2 
manual prior to proceeding.


* Features of the SDMS OS/2 Driver *

Enhances host adapter performance
Supports synchronous negotiation (including Fast SCSI)
Supports Wide SCSI (single-ended and differential)
Supports multiple host adapters
Supports Disconnect/Reselect
Supports scatter/gather
Allows tagged command queuing


* Description of the SDMS OS/2 Driver *

Although the Symbios Logic SCSI controller's firmware can access 
the SCSI hard disk drives attached to the computer 
independently, the SCSI device driver SYM8XX.ADD acts 
as an enhanced interface between the computer system and 
the SCSI BIOS firmware. Use of the device driver 
increases the abilities of the SCSI controller firmware 
and fully utilizes the advancements and improvements of 
80386 and higher microprocessors. 

The device driver is also necessary to support the use of 
SCSI tape drives and CD-ROM drives with an OS/2 system. 
The Symbios Logic SYM8XX.ADD device driver is written in 
compliance  with the IBM OS/2 ADD (Adapter Device Driver) 
specification, and works with third party applications 
that comply with the same specification.




*********** Installing Your SDMS OS/2 Driver ************



These installation instructions are specific and accurate 
for the SDMS OS/2 driver SYM8XX.ADD V4.01. You may have 
a more recent version of this driver. You should refer to 
the text file OS2.TXT located on the SDMS diskette for a 
version of these instructions guaranteed to match your 
driver.

Note:  If you previously installed OS2CAM.ADD (an older 
version of the OS2 driver), delete OS2CAM.ADD and delete 
the corresponding BASEDEV= statement in CONFIG.SYS after you 
complete installation procedures.  If you previously installed 
SYM8XX.ADD in a directory other than \OS2\BOOT, move
SYM8XX.ADD to \OS2\BOOT, where the new version of
SYM8XX.ADD can replace the old version.  The system continues 
to boot using the previous driver until these steps are taken.


* Installing SYM8XX.ADD (with OS/2 already installed) *

The Symbios Logic device driver floppy diskette contains three files, 
the device driver SYM8XX.ADD,  a text file, SYM8XX.DDP and an 
executable file, SYMCHECK.EXE. When the device driver installation 
utility under OS/2 is activated, it looks for a file with the DDP extension. 
The DDP file contains the necessary information to install the SCSI 
device driver.  The EXE file contains a utility that verifies that an 
appropriate adapter is present.

1) At the OS/2 Desktop, open the System Setup folder located within 
  the OS/2 System folder and double-click on the Device Driver Install 
  icon.

2) Insert the floppy diskette containing the Symbios Logic device driver 
   in the source drive.

3) Choose the Symbios Logic SYM8XX.ADD driver from the list 
   provided by clicking on it once. The choice is highlighted. 
   Then click the OK button, then the EXIT button.

4) To make sure that the installation is successful, open 
   the productivity folder on the OS/2 Desktop, then 
   double-click  on the OS/2 System Editor to start the editor. 
   Open the CONFIG.SYS file in the root directory and find the line:
 
            BASEDEV=SYM8XX.ADD /V

   Then check that the file SYM8XX.ADD is in the 
   \OS2\BOOT directory on the boot drive.


* Installing SYM8XX.ADD and OS/2 
              (from a floppy) to a SCSI Hard Drive *

In this case, since OS/2 is installed from a floppy 
diskette, it is not required that the driver be present to 
install the operating system (as is the case when 
installing from a CD-ROM).

1) After the installation of OS/2 is complete and the 
   WorkPlace Shell desktop is built, open the System 
   Setup folder in the OS/2 System folder and double- click 
   on the Device Driver Install icon.

2) Insert the floppy diskette containing the Symbios Logic device 
   driver in the source drive.

3) Choose the Symbios Logic SYM8XX.ADD driver from the list 
   provided by clicking on it once. The choice is highlighted. 
   Then click the OK button, then the EXIT button.

4) To make sure that the installation is successful, 
   open the productivity folder on the OS/2 Desktop, then 
   double-click on the OS/2 System Editor to start the editor. 
   Open the CONFIG.SYS file in the root directory and find the line:

            	BASEDEV=SYM8XX.ADD /V

   Then check that the file SYM8XX.ADD is in the 
   \OS2\BOOT directory on the boot drive.

5) Continue with the OS/2 installation process as 
   documented in the OS/2 Installation Guide.



* Installing SYM8XX.ADD and OS/2 
               (from a SCSI CD-ROM) to a SCSI Hard Drive *


To install OS/2 from a SCSI CD-ROM attached to a Symbios 
Logic host adapter, the SCSI driver must be present in order to 
access the CD-ROM. The following steps allow installation 
of OS/2 from a SCSI CD-ROM.

1) Make copies of the two floppy diskettes used for 
   installation that are included with the CD-ROM version 
   of OS/2. These disks are labeled "Installation Diskette" 
   and "Diskette 1".

2) Copy the file SYM8XX.ADD from the Symbios Logic distribution 
   diskette to the copy of "Diskette 1". "Diskette 1" does not contain 
   enough available space for a copy of SYM8XX.ADD. You must delete 
   files in order to copy the driver file onto the diskette. Any unused .ADD 
   driver may be deleted.

      When .ADD drivers are deleted from "Diskette 1", 
      make certain to delete or remark out the corresponding 
      BASEDEV= statement in CONFIG.SYS. Otherwise, error 
      messages show up during installation.

3) Edit the file CONFIG.SYS on the copy of "Diskette 1" 
   by adding the following line at the end of the file:

             BASEDEV=SYM8XX.ADD /V

4) Place the copy of "Installation Diskette" in the A: drive 
   and reboot the computer.

5) Proceed with the OS/2 installation process as 
   documented in the OS/2 Installation Guide.



* Driver Order in the CONFIG.SYS File *


Because of the way OS/2 assigns drive letters, the order 
in which drivers appear in the CONFIG.SYS file is 
important. The drivers must appear in the order in which 
the drive letters are assigned. In particular:

   - OS/2 Warp installs the BASEDEV= line at the 
     beginning of the target system's CONFIG.SYS file 
     regardless of where the line is located in that file 
     on "Diskette 1". You may need to rearrange the order 
     in which drivers appear in the CONFIG.SYS file for 
     the target system.

   - If the system is to boot from a hard drive attached 
     to an IDE bus, the IDE driver must appear before 
     SYM8XX.ADD in CONFIG.SYS. 

Refer to the OS/2 documentation to fully understand this 
requirement.


* Command Line Options *


The SYM8XX.ADD driver has several embedded functions 
which are accessed via switches on the command line 
in the CONFIG.SYS file. These options are described 
below.


Using the /VERBOSE ( or /V ) Option:

    Usage:
        /VERBOSE

This option appears on the command line by default. 
It enables display of a banner, version number, and 
SCSI bus information during start up of the system. 

    For example, if you wish to see more detailed information displayed when
    you boot, the line in CONFIG.SYS that loads SYM8XX.ADD should look like
    this:

    BASEDEV=SYM8XX.ADD /VERBOSE

          or

    BASEDEV=SYM8XX.ADD /V

    To disable this feature, remove this switch from the command line.


Using the /!DM Option:

    Usage:
        /!DM<path[:id]>[,<path[:id]>]*

    Where:
        path represents a host adapter ID. 
        id represents a SCSI target ID on the indicated path. 
        [ ]'s indicate optional information.
        * indicates the pattern enclosed in the [ ]'s may be repeated .

This option disables use of the IBM-supplied DASD manager 
(OS2DASD.DMD) for the devices listed. The DASD manager is 
used to support direct access devices such as hard drives. 

    For example, if you want to disable OS2DASD.DMD for devices 
    on host adapter 0 at target IDs 3 and 5, the line in CONFIG.SYS 
    that loads SYM8XX.ADD should look like this:

    BASEDEV=SYM8XX.ADD /!DM<0:3>, <0:5>


Using the /!SM Option:

    Usage:
        /!SM<path[:id]>[,<path[:id]>]*

    Where:
        path represents a host adapter ID. 
        id represents a SCSI target ID on the indicated path. 
        [ ]'s indicate optional information.
        * indicates the pattern enclosed in the [ ]'s may be repeated .

This option disables use of the IBM-supplied SCSI manager
(OS2SCSI.DMD) for the devices listed.  The SCSI manager is
used to support SCSI tape drives.

    For example, if you want to disable OS2SCSI.DMD for devices 
    on host adapter 0 at target IDs 3 and 5, the line in CONFIG.SYS 
    that loads SYM8XX.ADD should look like this:

          BASEDEV=SYM8XX.ADD /!SM<0:3>,<0:5>


Using the /SYNCH_RATE ( or /SR ) Option:

    Usage:
        /SYNCH_RATE=n<path[:id]>[,n<path[:id]>]*

    Where:
        n =0, 5, 10 or 20.
        path represents a host adapter ID. 
        id represents a SCSI target ID on the indicated path. 
        [ ]'s indicate optional information.
        * indicates the pattern enclosed in the [ ]'s may be repeated .

This sets the maximum synchronous transfer rate (in mega transfers per
second) to negotiate with a particular device.  The allowable values for
this setting are 0, 5, 10 and 20 mega transfers per second, if the adapter is 
capable of the specified speed. All  host adapters in the 8XX family support
at least 10 mega transfers per second;  some support 20 mega
transfers per second.  To turn off synchronous transfers for a particular
device, specify 0 (zero).  The value set by this option only defines
the maximum transfer rate negotiated. The actual rate also depends on
what the device can do. The default value is the fastest transfer rate that 
is supported by a particular host adapter.

    For example, if you want to turn off synchronous transfers to
    ID=3 on host adapter 0, the line in CONFIG.SYS that loads SYM8XX.ADD
    should look like this:

    BASEDEV=SYM8XX.ADD /SYNCH_RATE=0<0:3>

    As another example, if you want to set synchronous transfers to 10 mega
    transfers per second on all devices on adapter 1, the line in CONFIG.SYS
    that loads SYM8XX.ADD should look like this:

    BASEDEV=SYM8XX.ADD /SR=10<1>


Using the /SYNCH_OFFSET ( or /SO ) Option:

    Usage:
        /SYNCH_OFFSET=n<path[:id]>[,n<path[:id]>]*

    Where:
        n = 0..maximum synchronous offset for the adapter.
        path represents a host adapter ID. 
        id represents a SCSI target ID on the indicated path. 
        [ ]'s indicate optional information.
        * indicates the pattern enclosed in the [ ]'s may be repeated .

This sets the maximum synchronous offset to negotiate with a particular
device.  The allowable values for this setting are 0 to the maximum
synchronous offset supported by the specified path.  The SYM53C8XX
controller chips support offsets up to 16.  If 0 (zero) is specified for the 
synchronous offset value, then synchronous transfers are turned off for 
any specified device.  The value set by this option only defines the 
maximum offset that is negotiated. The resulting rate also depends on 
the device capability.  The default value is the maximum offset that is 
supported by a particular host adapter.

    For example, if you want to change the synchronous offset to 6 for
    ID=3, the line in CONFIG.SYS that loads SYM8XX.ADD should
    look like this:

    BASEDEV=SYM8XX.ADD /SYNCH_OFFSET=6<0:3>


Using the /TIMEOUT ( or /T ) Option:

    Usage:
        /TIMEOUT=n<path[:id]>[,n<path[:id]>]*

    Where:
        n = time-out value in seconds for device, n=(0..65535), 0=infinite.
       path represents a host adapter ID. 
       id represents a SCSI target ID on the indicated path. 
       [ ]'s indicate optional information.
       * indicates the pattern enclosed in the [ ]'s may be repeated .

SYM8XX.ADD uses a time-out mechanism to detect certain errors.  When
SYM8XX.ADD issues a command to a SCSI device, a timer is started.  If
the timer expires before the command completes, SYM8XX.ADD assumes that
something has gone wrong with the device, and takes steps to recover.
The default value for this is 10 seconds, and the maximum setting
for this switch is 0, which represents no time-out.  If you set the value to be 
less than the system has allocated for a particular device, your value is 
ignored.

    For example, if you have a particularly slow device on ID=3 and you wish
    to extend the time-out on this device to 60 seconds, then the line in
    CONFIG.SYS that loads SYM8XX.ADD should look like this:

    BASEDEV=SYM8XX.ADD /TIMEOUT=60<0:3>


Using the /DISCONNECT ( or /DC ) Option:

    Usage:
        /DISCONNECT=n<path[:id]>[,n<path[:id]>]*

    Where:
        n = ON or OFF.
        path represents a host adapter ID. 
        id represents a SCSI target ID on the indicated path. 
        [ ]'s indicate optional information.
        * indicates the pattern enclosed in the [ ]'s may be repeated .

SCSI devices have the ability to disconnect from the bus during an I/O
transfer.  This option is used to allow (or not allow) a device to
disconnect during an I/O.  If a particular adapter has parity checking
disabled, then you must use this option to disable disconnects for all
devices on that adapter that do not generate parity. This is because
the /PARITY option does not change the disconnect state for any
device on that adapter.  See the /PARITY option for more information.

Valid options are "ON" (allow disconnects) and "OFF" (do not allow
disconnects).  The default for all devices is "ON".

    For example, if you want to disable disconnects on the device at
    ID=2, then the line in CONFIG.SYS that loads SYM8XX.ADD should
    look like this:

    BASEDEV=SYM8XX.ADD /DISCONNECT=OFF<0:2>


Using the /PARITY ( or /P ) Option:

    Usage:
        /PARITY=n<path[,path]*>[,n<path[,path]*>]*

    Where:
        n = ON or OFF.
        path represents a host adapter ID. 
        [ ]'s indicate optional information.
        * indicates the pattern enclosed in the [ ]'s may be repeated.

The SYM53C8XX chips are capable of enabling or disabling the SCSI bus
data integrity checking feature know as "parity".  Some non-SCSI
compliant devices sold as SCSI devices do not generate parity.
You can use this option to disable parity checking.  The
SYM53C8XX chips always generate parity (for outputs), but may
optionally check the parity (for inputs).  Valid options are "ON"
(check parity) and "OFF" (do not check parity).  The default for all
devices is "ON", which enables parity checking for all devices.

Note:  When disabling parity checking, it is necessary to disable
disconnects for any device that does not generate parity, as the
SYM53C8XX chips cannot disable parity checking for that device during
the reselection phase.  Please refer to using the /DISCONNECT option
for more information on how to disable disconnects for a device.  If a
device does not generate parity and it disconnects, the I/O never
completes as the reselection never completes.

    For example, to turn off parity checking on host adapter number 0, the
    line in CONFIG.SYS that loads SYM8XX.ADD should look like this:

    BASEDEV=SYM8XX.ADD /PARITY=OFF<0>


Using the /QTAG ( or /QT) Option:

    Usage:
        /QTAG=n<path[:id]>[,n<path[:id]>]*

    Where:
        n = the number of queue tags allowed for a device (0..256).
        path represents a host adapter ID. 
        id represents a SCSI target ID on the indicated path. 
        [ ]'s indicate optional information.
        * indicates the pattern enclosed in the [ ]'s may be repeated .

Queue tagging is used to allow more than one outstanding command
per SCSI device.  Some non-SCSI compliant devices sold as SCSI 
devices do not allow queue tags, in which case queue tagging should 
be disabled. The value given in the command line is the 
depth of the queue for queue tags for the device(s) indicated. To 
disable queue tag support, a value of 0 or 1 should be given. 

    For example, to turn off queue tagging for ID 3 on host adapter number
    0, the line in CONFIG.SYS that loads SYM8XX.ADD should look 
    like this:

    BASEDEV=SYM8XX.ADD /QTAG=0<0:3>

    As another example, if you want to set the queue depth to 5 for all 
    devices on host adapter number 2, the line in CONFIG.SYS that 
    loads SYM8XX.ADD should look like this:

    BASEDEV=SYM8XX.ADD /QT=5<2>


Using the /WIDTH ( or /W) Option:

    Usage:
        /WIDTH=n<path[:id]>[,n<path[:id]>]*

    Where:
        n = 8 or 16.
        path represents a host adapter ID. 
        id represents a SCSI target ID on the indicated path. 
        [ ]'s indicate optional information.
        * indicates the pattern enclosed in the [ ]'s may be repeated .

Devices attached to a SCSI bus are narrow or wide devices.  Narrow 
devices transfer data one byte (or 8 bits) at a time.  Wide devices 
transfer two bytes (or 16 bits) at a time.  The value given in the
command line option determines the size of data transfers.

    For example, to have the device at ID 3 on host adapter number 0 
    treated as a narrow device, the line in CONFIG.SYS that loads 
    SYM8XX.ADD should look like this:

    BASEDEV=SYM8XX.ADD /WIDTH=8<0:3>

    As another example, if you want to have all devices on host adapter 
    number 2 treated as narrow devices, the line in CONFIG.SYS that 
    loads SYM8XX.ADD should look like this:

    BASEDEV=SYM8XX.ADD /W=8<2>




* Troubleshooting *


YOU CANNOT ACCESS THE SCSI DEVICES.

Make sure the SCSI device driver is installed properly.

Make sure each device has power.

Verify that a BASEDEV = SYM8XX.ADD /V line  exists in the 
CONFIG.SYS file. 

Verify that SYM8XX.ADD is in the appropriate 
directory (\OS2\BOOT).

Check the cable connections and the host adapter 
installation.


THE COMPUTER HANGS OR LOCKS UP WHEN BOOTING AND THE SCSI 
DEVICES ATTACHED ARE NOT SEEN BY THE COMPUTER SYSTEM.

Make sure that all the SCSI devices are configured at 
different ID numbers (the boot drive must have the 
lowest ID).

Make sure both, but only, the ends of the SCSI bus are 
terminated.

Make sure the device driver is listed in CONFIG.SYS (and 
loaded when booting).

THE DEVICE DRIVER DOES NOT SEE ONE OF THE SCSI DEVICES.

Reboot the computer.

Make sure the SCSI devices have different ID numbers (the 
boot drive must have the lowest ID).

Make sure both, but only, the ends of the SCSI bus are 
terminated.

Check the cable and power connections.

OS/2 INSTALLS TO AN IDE DRIVE IN THE SYSTEM INSTEAD OF 
INSTALLING TO THE SCSI DRIVE.

The IDE drive must be physically disconnected and disabled 
in the CMOS setup before attempting to install to a SCSI 
drive.


THE FOLLOWING MESSAGE IS DISPLAYED AT BOOTUP.

     "OS/2 is unable to operate your hard disk or diskette drive.
       The system is stopped. Correct the preceding error and
       restart the system."

This problem is caused when your system is booting from a hard
drive attached to an IDE bus, a SCSI disk is attached to your 
Symbios Logic 8XX host adapter, and the statement 

     BASEDEV=SYM8XX.ADD /V /Q

appears in the CONFIG.SYS file before the IDE device driver 
statement.

Boot the system using the floppy drive and installation diskettes to 
the F3=Command Prompt screen. Use the tedit.exe editor to edit the 
CONFIG.SYS file. Move the BASEDEV=SYM8XX.ADD /V /Q statement
to the last line in the CONFIG.SYS file.

Restart your system. 


Download Driver Pack

How To Update Drivers Manually

After your driver has been downloaded, follow these simple steps to install it.

  • Expand the archive file (if the download file is in zip or rar format).

  • If the expanded file has an .exe extension, double click it and follow the installation instructions.

  • Otherwise, open Device Manager by right-clicking the Start menu and selecting Device Manager.

  • Find the device and model you want to update in the device list.

  • Double-click on it to open the Properties dialog box.

  • From the Properties dialog box, select the Driver tab.

  • Click the Update Driver button, then follow the instructions.

Very important: You must reboot your system to ensure that any driver updates have taken effect.

For more help, visit our Driver Support section for step-by-step videos on how to install drivers for every file type.

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