ROCKWELL.TXT Driver File Contents (1414PCV.exe)

******************************************************************************
************** This Document is for the Rockwell based fax/modem *************
************ This is identified on the top left back of the modem ************
******************************************************************************
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Table of Contents - Rockwell Chip Set

 1**Extended AT Command Set
 2**AT Command Result Codes
 3**S-Registers
 4**Bit Mapped and S-Registers
 5**Error Correction, Data Compression, and Flow Control
 6**Fax Operation
 7**Diagnostic Tests
______________________________________________________________________________
1**Extended AT Command Set****************************************************

AT Commands
A/    Re-execute previous command. 
A     Answer. 
Bn    Select CCITT or Bell standard 
	B0      CCITT operation at 300 or 1200 b/s
	B1      Bell operation at 300 or 1200 b/s (default)
Cn    Carrier control. The only valid parameter is 1.
D       Dial
	0-9     Dial DTMF digits 0 to 9.
	*       Dial the "star" symbol (tone dialing only).
	#       Dial the "pound" symbol (tone dialing only).
	A-D     Dial DTMF digits A, B, C, and D. Some countries may prohibit
		sending these digits during dialing.
	L       Re-dial last number. L must immediately follow D; all further
		characters are ignored.
	P       Select pulse dialing; affects current and subsequent dialing.
	T       Select tone dialing; affects current and subsequent dialing.
	R       Not currently implemented. 
	S=r     Dial stored number r (see &Z for storing numbers). 
	!       Flash: go on-hook for a time defined by S29.  Country
		requirements may limit the time.
	W       Wait for dial tone. If no dial tone is detected within the
		time specified by S7, the modem aborts the rest of the
		sequence, goes on-hook, and generates an error message.
	@       Wait for silence. The modem waits for at least 5 seconds of
		silence in the call-progress frequency band before continuing
		with the next dial string parameter. If the modem does not
		detect these 5 seconds of silence before the expiration of
		the call abort timer S7, it terminates the call attempt with
		a NO ANSWER message. If busy detection is enabled, the modem
		may terminate the call with a BUSY result code. If answer
		tone arrives during execution of this parameter, the modem
		handshakes with the remote modem.
	&       Wait for credit card dial tone then dial rest of string. If
		the modem waits for the time specified by S7 then aborts the
		call.
	,       Pause. The modem pauses for a time specified by S8 before
		dialing the following digits. Most often used when dialing an
		outside line through a PBX.
	;       Return to command mode after processing command. This
		character allows the user to issue additional AT commands
		while remaining off-hook, either on the original command line
		or on subsequent command lines. The modem monitors call
		progress only after an additional dial command is issued
		without the ; terminator. Useful for issuing long dialing
		strings that would otherwise overflow the command buffer.
		Use H to abort the dial in progress and go back on-hook.
	^       Disable calling tone transmission; applicable to current
		dial attempt only.
	( )     Ignored; can be used to format the dial string. 
	-       Ignored; can be used to format the dial string. 
	<sp>    Spaces are ignored; can be used to format the dial string. 
	<i>     Invalid characters are ignored. 
	>       If enabled by a country-specific parameter, the modem
		generates a grounding pulse on the GND output.

En    Command echo
	E0      Disables command echo.
	E1      Enables command echo (default). 

Fn    Select line modulation (14.4 Modems only)
	The line modulation is fixed unless automode is selected. This
	command interacts with S37 and the N command. The parameter value, if
	valid, is written to S31 bit 1. To select line modulation, use either
	the F command or a combination of S37 and the N command, but not both.
	F0      Selects auto-detect mode. Sets N1 and S31 bit 1. In this
		mode, the modem configures for automode operation. All
		connect speeds supported by the modem are possible, according
		to the remote modem's preference. The contents of S37 are
		ignored, as is the sensed DTE speed.
	F1      Selects V.21 or Bell 103, according to the B setting, as the
		only acceptable line modulation resulting in a subsequent
		connection. Sets N0, sets S37 to 1, and clears S31 bit 1.
		Equivalent to the command string ATN0S37=1.
	F2      Not supported. 
	F3      Selects V.23 as the only acceptable line modulation for a
		subsequent connection. Originator is at 75 b/s and answerer
		is at 1200 b/s. Sets N0, sets S37 to 7, and clears S31 bit 1.
		Equivalent to the command string ATN0S37=7.
	F4      Selects V.22 1200 or Bell 212A, according to the B command
		setting, as the only acceptable line modulation for a
		subsequent connection.  Sets N0, sets S37 to 5, and clears
		S31 bit 1.  Equivalent to the command string ATN0S37=5.
	F5      Selects V.22 bis as the only acceptable line  modulation for
		a subsequent connection. Sets N0, sets S37 to 6, and clears
		S31 bit 1.  Equivalent to the command string ATN0S37=6.
	F6      Select V.32 bis 4800 or V.32 4800 as the only  acceptable line
		modulation for a subsequent  connection. Sets N0, sets S37 to
		8, and clears      S31 bit 1. Equivalent to the command
		string ATN0S37=8.
	F7      Selects V.32 bis 7200 as the only acceptable line modulation
		for a subsequent connection. Sets N0, sets S37 to 12, and
		clears S31 bit 1. Equivalent to command string ATN0S37=12.
	F8      Selects V.32 bis 9600 or V.32 9600 as the only acceptable
		line modulations for a subsequent connection. Sets N0, sets
		S37 to 9, and clears S31 bit 1. Equivalent to the command
		string ATN0S37=9.
	F9      Selects V.32 bis 12000 as the only acceptable line modulation
		for a subsequent connection. Sets N0, sets S37 to 10, and
		clears S31 bit 1. Equivalent to command string ATN0S37=10.
	F10     Selects V.32 bis 14400 as the only acceptable line modulation
		for a subsequent connection. Sets N0, sets S37 to 11, and
		clears S31 bit 1. Equivalent to command string ATN0S37=11.

Hn    Disconnect (hang up)
	H0      (Default.) The modem releases the line if currently on-line
		and terminates any test in progress. Country-specific,
		modulation-specific,and error-correction-protocol-specific
		(S38) processing is handled outside the H0 command.
	H1      If on-hook, the modem goes off-hook and enters command mode.
		The modem returns on-hook after a period of time determined
		by S7.

In    Identification
	I0      Product code (e.g., "14400").
	I1      Calculates the ROM checksum and reports the least significant
		byte of the checksum.
	I2      Calculates the ROM checksum and compares it with the prestored
		checksum. Reports "OK" is it compares and "ERROR" if it does
		not compare.
	I3      Reports the firmware version, basic model, application code,
		and interface type code.
	I4      Reports OEM defined identifier string.
	I5      Reports Country Code parameter
	I6      Reports modem data pump model and internal code revision.
	I7      Reports the DAA code resulting from MCU interrogation of the
		DAA for auto DAA recognition.

Ln    Speaker volume
	L0      Off or low volume.
	L1      Low volume (default).
	L2      Medium volume.
	L3      High volume.

Mn    Speaker control
	M0      Speaker is always off.
	M1      Speaker is on during call establishment, but goes off when
		carrier is detected (default).
	M2      Speaker is always on.
	M3      Speaker is off during dialing and when receiving carrier, but
		on during answering.

Nn    Automode enable.
	N0      Automode detection is disabled.  A subsequent handshake is
		conducted according to the contents of S37 or, if S37 is
		zero, according to the most recently sensed DTE speed.
	N1      Automode detection is enabled (default).  A subsequent
		handshake is conducted according to the automode algorithm
		supported by the modem. This command is equivalent to F0.

On    Return to on-line data mode
	O0      Enters on-line data mode without a retrain.  Handling is
		determined by the call establishment task. Generally, if a
		connection  exists, this command connects the DTE back to
		the remote modem after escape.
	O1      Enters on-line data mode with a retrain.

Qn    Quiet results codes control
	Q0      Enables result codes to the DTE (default).
	Q1      Disables result codes to the DTE.

Sr    Read or write to S-register r
	r       Establishes S-register r as the default register.
	r=n     Sets S-register r to the value n.
	r?      Reports the value of S-register r.

	Following country restrictions, some commands may be accepted but the
	value limited and replaced by a maximum or minimum value.

Vn    Result code form
	V0      Enables short-form (terse) result codes.
	V1      Enables long-form (verbose) result codes        (default).

Wn    Connect Message Control
	W0      Upon connection, the modem reports only the DTE speed
		(default).
	W1      Upon connection, the modem reports the line speed, the error
		correction protocol, and the DTE speed, respectively.
	W2      Upon connection, the modem reports the DCE speed.

Xn    Error correction message control
	X0      Disables monitoring of busy tones unless forced otherwise by
		country requirements; sends only OK, CONNECT, RING,
		NO CARRIER, ERROR, and NO ANSWER result codes.  Blind dialing
		enabled or disabled by country parameters.  If busy tone
		detection is enforced and busy tone is detected, NO CARRIER
		is reported.  If dial tone detection is enforced and dial
		tone is not detected, NO CARRIER is reported instead of
		NO DIAL TONE.  The value 000b is written to S22 bits 6,
		5, and 4 respectively.
	X1      Disables monitoring of busy tones unless forced otherwise by
		country requirements; sends only OK, CONNECT, RING,
		NO CARRIER, ERROR, NO ANSWER, and CONNECT rate. Blind dialing
		enabled or disabled by country parameters. If busy tone
		detection is enforced and busy tone is detected, NO CARRIER
		is reported instead of BUSY. If dial tone detection is not
		detected, NO CARRIER is reported instead of NO DIAL TONE.  The
		value 100b is written to The value 100b is written to S22 bits
		6, 5, and 4 respectively.
	X2      Disables monitoring of busy tones unless forced otherwise by
		country requirements; sends only OK, CONNECT, RING,
		NO CARRIER, ERROR, NO DIALTONE, NO ANSWER, and CONNECT rate.
		If busy tone detection is enforced and busy tone is detected,
		NO CARRIER is reported instead of BUSY. If dial tone detection
		is enforced or selected and dial tone is not detected,
		NO CARRIER is reported instead of NO DIAL TONE.  The value
		101b is written to S22  bits 6, 5, and 4 respectively.
	X3      Enables monitoring of busy tones; sends only    OK, CONNECT,
		RING, NO CARRIER,  ERROR, NO DIALTONE, NO ANSWER, and CONNECT
		or CARRIER rate. Blind dialing  enabled or disabled by
		country parameters. If dial tone detection is enforced and
		dial tone is not detected, NO CARRIER is reported. The
		value 110b is enforced or selected and dial tone is written
		to S22 bits 6, 5, and 4 respectively.
	X4      Enables monitoring of busy tones; sends all messages. The
		value 111b is written to S22 bits 6, 5, and 4 respectively.
		(Default.)

Yn    Long space disconnect
	Y0      Disables long space disconnect (default).
	Y1      Enables long space disconnect.

Zn    Soft reset and restore profile
	Z0      Soft reset and restore stored profile 0.
	Z1      Soft reset and restore stored profile 1.


AT& Commands

&Cn   Data Carrier Detect (DCD) option
	&C0     DCD remains ON at all times.
	&C1     DCD follows the state of the carrier (default).

&Dn   DTR option
	&D0     Default. DTR drop is interpreted according to the current &Q
		setting as follows:
		  &Q0, &Q5, &Q6: DTR is ignored (assumed ON). Allows operation
				 with DTEs that don't provide DTR.
		  &Q1, &Q4:      DTR drop causes the modem to hang up. Auto-
				 answer is not affected.
		&Q2, &Q3:      DTR drop causes the modem to hang up. Auto-
				 answer is inhibited.
	&D1     DTR drop is interpreted according to the current &Q setting
		as follows:
		  &Q1, &Q4, &Q5, &Q6: DTR drop is interpreted by the modem as
				 if the asynchronous escape sequence had been
				 entered. The modem returns to asynchronous
				 command mode without disconnecting.
		  &Q2, &Q3:      DTR drop causes the modem to hang up. Auto-
				 answer is inhibited.
	&D2     DTR drop is interpreted according to the current &Q setting
		as follows:
		  &Q0 through &Q6: DTR drop causes the modem to hang up. Auto-
				 answer is inhibited.
	&D3     DTR drop is interpreted according to the current &Q setting
		as follows:
		  &Q0, &Q4, &Q5, &Q6: DTR drop causes the modem to perform a 
				 soft reset as if the Z command were received.
				 The &Y setting determines which profile is
				 loaded.
		  &Q2, &Q3:      DTR drop causes the modem to hang up. Auto-
				 answer is inhibited.

&Fn   Restore factory configuration (profile)
	    &F0    Recall factory profile 0 (default).
	    &F1    Recall factory profile 1.

&Gn   Select guard tone
	    &G0    Disables guard tone (default).
	    &G1    Disables guard tone.
	    &G2    Enables 1800-Hz guard tone.

&Jn   Telephone jack control
	&J0    Single phone line, RJ-11 jack (default).
	&J1    Multiple phone lines, RJ-12 or RJ-13 jack. 

&Kn   Flow control
	&K0     Disables flow control.
	&K3     Enables RTS/CTS flow control (default for data modem modes). 
	&K4     Enables XON/XOFF flow control.
	&K5     Supports transparent XON/XOFF flow control.
	&K6     Enables both RTS/CTS and XON/XOFF flow control (default for
		fax modem modes).

&Pn   Select pulse dial make/break ratio
	&P0     39/61 make/break ratio at 10 pulses per second  (default).
	&P1     33/67 make/break ratio at 10 pulses per second.
	&P2     39/61 make/break ratio at 20 pulses per second.
	&P3     33/67 make/break ratio at 20 pulses per second.

&Rn   RTS/CTS option
	&R0     In synchronous mode, CTS tracks the state of RTS; the
		RTS-to-CTS delay is defined by S26.  In asynchronous mode,
		CTS acts according to V.25 bis handshake.
	&R1     In synchronous mode, CTS is always ON (RTS transitions are
		ignored).  In asynchronous mode, CTS drops only if required
		by flow control. (Default.)
&Sn   DSR override
	&S0     DSR remains ON at all times (default).
	&S1     DSR becomes active after answer tone has been detected and
		inactive after carrier has been lost.

&Tn   Test and diagnostics
	&T0     Terminates test in progress and clears S16.
	&T1     Initiates local analog loopback, V.54 Loop 3.  Sets S16 bit 0.
		If a connection exists when this command is issued, the modem
		hangs up.  The CONNECT rate message is displayed upon the
		start of the test.
	&T2     Returns ERROR.
	&T3     Initiates local digital loopback, V.54 Loop 2.  Sets S16
		bit 2. If no connection exists, ERROR is returned. Sets S16
		bit 4 when the test is in progress.
	&T4     Enables digital loopback acknowledgment for remote request,
		i.e., a remote digital loopback (RDL) request from a remote
		modem is allowed. Sets S23 bit 0. (Default.)
	&T5     Disables digital loopback acknowledgment for remote request,
		i.e., a remote digital loopback (RDL) request from a remote
		modem is denied.  Clears S23 bit 0.
	&T6     Requests a remote digital loopback (RDL), V.54 Loop 2,
		without self-test. If no connection exists, ERROR is
		returned. Sets S16 bit 4 when  the test is in progress. The
		CONNECT or CARRIER rate message is displayed upon the start
		of the test.
	&T7     Requests a remote digital loopback (RDL), V.54 Loop 2, with
		self-test. (In self-test, a test pattern is looped back and
		checked by the modem.) If no connection exists, ERROR is
		S18 or the &T0 or H command, the number of detected errors
		is reported to the DTE. Sets S16 bit 5 when the test is in
		progress.
	&T8     Initiates local analog loopback, V.54 Loop 3, with self-test.
		(In self-test, a test pattern is looped back and checked by
		the modem.) If a connection exists, the modem hangs up before
		the test is initiated. When the test is terminated by
		expiration of S18 or the &T0 or H command, the number of
		detected errors is reported to the DTE. Sets S16 bit 6 when
		the test is in  progress. This command may not be available
		in some countries due to PTT restrictions.

&V    Display current configuration and stored profiles

&Wn   Store current configuration
	&W0     Store the current configuration as profile 0.
	&W1     Store the current configuration as profile 1.

&Xn   Select synchronous timing
	&X0     Internal timing. The modem generates the transmit clock
		signal and applies it to the TXCLK output at the serial
		interface.
	&X1     External timing. The local DTE sources the transmit clock
		signal on the XTCLK input of the serial interface. The modem
		applies this    clock to the TXCLK output at the serial
		interface.
	&X2     Slave receive timing. The modem derives the transmit clock
		signal from the incoming carrier and applies it to the TXCLK
		output at the serial interface.

&Yn   Designate a default reset profile
	&Y0     The modem uses profile 0.
	&Y1     The modem uses profile 1.

&Zn=x Store telephone number in 1 of 4 locations
	n = 0-3, x = dial string (256-byte NVRAM). 


AT% Commands
%Cn   Enable or disable data compression
	%C0     Disables data compression. Resets S46 bit 1.
	%C1     Enables MNP 5 data compression negotiation. Resets S46 bit 1.
	%C2     Enables V.42 bis data compression. Sets S46 bit 1.
	%C3     Enables both V.42 bis and MNP 5 data compression. Sets S46
		bit 1. (Default.)

%En   Line quality monitor
      The parameter value, if valid, is written to S41 bits 2 and 6. If
      enabled, the modem attempts to retrain for a maximum of 30 seconds.
	%E0     Disable line quality monitor and auto-retrain (default).
	%E1     Enable line quality monitor and auto-retrain.
	%E2     Enable line quality monitor and fallback/fall-forward. 

%L    Line signal level
	Returns a value that indicates the received signal level. For example,
	009 = -9 dBm, 043 = -43 dBm, and so on.

%Q    Line signal quality
	Reports line signal quality (DAA-dependent). Returns higher order byte
	of the EQM value. Based on EQM value, retrain or fallback/fall-forward
	may be initiated if enabled by %E1 or %E2.

%TTn  PTT testing utilities 
	%TT00-%TT009  DTMF tone dial digits 0 to 9.
	%TT0A         DTMF digit *.
	%TT0B         DTMF digit A.
	%TT0C         DTMF digit B.
	%TT0D         DTMF digit C.
	%TT0E         DTMF digit #.
	%TT0F         DTMF digit D.
	%TT10         V.21 channel 1 mark (originate) symbol.
	%TT11         V.21 channel 2 mark symbol.
	%TT12         V.23 backward channel mark symbol.
	%TT13         V.23 forward channel mark symbol.
	%TT14         V.22 originate (call mark) signaling at 600 b/s.
	%TT15         V.22 originate (call mark) signaling at 1200 b/s.
	%TT16         V.22 bis originate (call mark) signaling at 2400 b/s.
	%TT17         V.22 answer signaling (guard tone if PTT-required).
	%TT18         V.22 bis answer signaling (guard tone if required).
	%TT19         V.21 channel 1 space symbol.
	%TT1A         V.21 channel 2 space symbol.
	%TT1B         V.23 backward channel space symbol.
	%TT1C         V.23 forward channel space symbol.
	%TT20         V.32 9600 b/s.
	%TT21         V.32 bis 14400 b/s.
	%TT30         Silence (on-line), i.e., go off-hook.
	%TT31         V.25 answer tone.
	%TT32         1800-Hz guard tone.
	%TT33         V.25 calling tone (1300 Hz).
	%TT34         Fax calling tone (1100 Hz).
	%TT40         V.21 channel 2.
	%TT41         V.27 ter 2400 bps.
	%TT42         V.27 ter 4800 bps.
	%TT43         V.29 7200 bps.
	%TT44         V.29 9600 bps.
	%TT45         V.17 7200 bps long train.
	%TT46         V.17 7200 bps short train.
	%TT47         V.17 9600 bps long train.
	%TT48         V.17 9600 bps short train.
	%TT49         V.17 12000 bps long train.
	%TT4A         V.17 12000 bps short train.
	%TT4B         V.17 14400 bps long train.
	%TT4C         V.17 14400 bps short train.
	%TT5R, S, C, A, P  V.FC modulation, where the R, S, C, A, and P
			   parameters are shown below.
	%TT6R, S, C, A, P  V.34 modulation, where the R, S, C, A, and P
			   parameters are shown below.

	R       Data Rate
	0       2400 (V.34 only)
	1       4800 (V.34 only)
	2       7200 (V.34 only)
	3       9600 (V.34 only)
	4       12000 (V.34 only)
	5       14400
	6       16800
	7       19200
	8       21600
	9       24000
	A       26400
	B       28800
	C       31200 
	D       33600 

	S       Symbol Rate (Baud)
	0       2400
	1       Reserved
	2       2800
	3       3000
	4       3200
	5       3429

	C       V.FC Carrier Bias (V.FC Only)
	2B      -100
	2C      -95
	...     ...
	3E      -10
	3F      -5
	40      0 (default)
	41      +5
	42      +10
	...     ...
	53      +95
	54      +100

	A       Auxiliary (secondary) Channel Enable/Disable
	0       Disabled (default)
	1       Enabled

	P       Amount of Upper Band Edge Atten. Comp. (dB) (V.FC)
	0       0 (default)
	1       1
	...     ...
	8       8
	9       9
	A       10
	B       12
	C       13
	D       14
	E       15
	F       22

AT\ Commands

\An   Select maximum MNP block size
	\A0     64 characters.
	\A1     128 characters (default).
	\A2     192 characters.
	\A3     256 characters.

\Bn   Transmit break to remote modem
	\B1-\B9 Break length in 100-ms units. (Default = 3.) Non-error-
		corrected mode only.

\Kn   Break control
	Determines how modem handles a break.
	If the break is received from the DTE while the modem is in data mode:
	\K0     Enter command mode; no break sent to remote modem.
	\K1     Clear data buffers and send break to remote
		modem.
	\K2     Same as 0.
	\K3     Send break to remote modem immediately.
	\K4     Same as 0.
	\K5     Send break to remote modem in sequence with transmitted data
		(default).

	If the break is received from the DTE while the modem is in command
	mode:
	\K0     Clear data buffers and send break to remote modem.
	\K1     Same as 0.
	\K2     Send break to remote modem immediately.
	\K3     Same as 2.
	\K4     Send break to remote modem in sequence with data.
	\K5         Same as 4 (default). 

	If the break is received from a remote modem during a non-error-                                      
	corrected connection:
	\K0     Clears data buffers and sends break to the DTE.
	\K1     Same as 0.
	\K2     Send a break immediately to DTE.
	\K3     Same as 2.
	\K4     Send break to DTE in sequence with received data.
	\K5     Same as 4 (default). 

\Ln   MNP block/stream mode select
	\L0     Use stream mode for MNP connection (default).
	\L1     Use interactive block mode for MNP connection. This command
		accepts block mode but implements stream mode.

\Nn   Operating mode
	\N0     Normal speed-buffered mode; disables error-correction mode.
		(Forces &Q6.)
	\N1     Not used.
	\N2     Reliable (error-correction) mode. The modem first attempts a
		LAPM connection and then an MNP connection. Failure to make a
		reliable connection results in the modem hanging up. (Forces
		&Q5, S36=4, and S48=7.)
	\N3     Auto-reliable mode. Identical to \N2 except that failure to
		make a reliable connection results in the modem falling back
		to the speed- buffered normal mode. (Forces &Q5, S36=7,
		and S48=7.)
	\N4     LAPM error-correction mode. Failure to make a LAPM error-
		correction connection results in the modem hanging up.
		(Forces &Q5 and S48=0.) The MNP 10 command -K1 can override
		the \N4 command.
	\N5     MNP error-correction mode. Failure to make an MNP error-
		correction connection results in the modem hanging up.
		(Forces &Q5, S36=4, and S48=128.)

\Vn    Single Line Connect Message Enable
	\V0     Connect messages are controlled by the single command setings
		X, W, and S95.
	\V1     Connect messages are displayed in the single line format
		described below subject to the command settings V and Q. In
		Non-Verbose mode, single line connect messages are disabled
		and a single numeric result code is generated for CONNECT DTE.

AT+ Commands

+MS	Select Modulation

This extended-format command selects the modulation and, optionally,
enables or disables automode, specifies the lowest and highest connection
rates, selects m-Law or A-Law codec type, and enables or disables robbed bit
signaling generation (server modem) or detection (client modem) using one
to five subparameters.

The command format is:
+MS= <mod> [,[<automode>][,[<min_rate>][,[<max_rate>][,[<x_law>]
[,[< rb_signaling>]]]]]]<CR>

Notes:
1.      For 14400 bps and lower speeds, the Nn command and S37 register can
        alternatively be used, in which case the +MS subparameters will
        modified to reflect the Nn and S37=x settings. Use of the Nn and
        S37=x commands is not recommended but is provided for compatibility
        with existing communication software. (S37 is not updated by the +MS
        command.)

2.      Subparameters not entered (enter a comma only or <CR> to skip the
        last subparameter) remain at their current values.

Reporting Selected Options

The modem can send a string of information to the DTE consisting of selected
options using the following command:

+MS?

The response is:
+MS: <mod>,<automode>,<min_rate>,<max_rate>,<x_law>,<rb_signaling>

For example,
+MS: 56,1,300,56000,0,0 [RC56 default values]
+MS: 11,1,300,33600,0,0 [RC336 default values]
+MS: 10,1,300,14400,0,0 [RC144 default values]

Reporting Supported Options

The modem can send a string of information to the DTE consisting of supported
options using the following command:

+MS=?

The response is:
+MS: (list of supported <mod> values), (list of supported <automode> values),
(list of supported <min_rate> values), (list of supported <max_rate> values),
(list of supported <x_law> values), (list of supported <rb_signaling> values)

For example,
+MS: (0,1,2,3,9,10,11,56, 64,69),(0,1),(300-33600),(300-56000),(0,1),(0,1)
     [RC56]
+MS: (0,1,2,3,9,10,11,64,69),(0,1),(300-33600),(300-33600),(0,1),(0,1)
     [RC336]
+MS: (0,1,2,3,9,10,64,69),(0,1),(300-14400),(300-14400),(0,1),(0,1)
     [RC144]

Subparameter Definitions

1. <mod> = A decimal number which specifies the preferred modulation
(automode enabled) or the modulation (automode disabled) to use in
originating or answering a connection. The options are:

<mod>	Modulation	Possible Rates (bps)			1 Notes
  0	V.21		300
  1	V.22		1200
  2	V.22bis		2400 or 1200
  3	V.23		1200					See Note 2
  9     V.32            9600 or 4800                            
  10    V.32bis         14400, 12000, 9600, 7200, or 4800       Default for RC144
  11    V.34            33600, 31200, 28800, 26400, 24000,      Default for RC56/
                        21600, 19200, 16800, 14400, 12000,      RC336/RC288
			9600, 7200, 4800, or 2400
  56    K56flex         56000, 54000, 52000, 50000, 48000,      [RC56 only]
                        46000, 44000, 42000, 40000, 38000,
                        36000, 34000, 32000

  64    Bell            103 300
  69    Bell            212 1200

Notes:

1. See optional <automode>, <min_rate>, and <max_rate> subparameters.
2. For V.23, originating modes transmit at 75 bps and receive at 1200 bps;
   answering modes transmit at 1200 bps and receive at 75 bps. The rate is
   always specified as 1200 bps.


The modem may also automatically switch to another modulation (automode),
subject to the following constraints:

a. The modem may not be able to automatically switch from the current
   modulation (specified by <mod>) to some other modulation.
   For example, there is no standard way to automode from Bell 103 to V.23.
b. The DTE may disable automode operation (see <automode> below).
c. The DTE may constrain the range of modulations available by specifying
   the lowest and highest rates (see <min_rate> and <max_rate> below).
2. <automode> is an optional numeric value which enables or disables
   automatic modulation negotiation using V.8 bis/V.8 or V.32 bis Annex A.
   The options are:

<automode>      Option Selected                         Notes
    0           Automode disabled
    1           Automode enabled using V.8 bis/V.8      Default
                or V.32 Annex A

The default value is 1, which enables automode. Note, however, there are
modulations for which there is no automatic negotiation,
e.g., Bell 212 (<mod> = 69).

For <automode> = 0 (automode disabled, i.e., fixed modulation):

a. If <max_rate> is within the rates supported by the selected modulation,
   the selected rate is that specified by <max_rate>.

   For example:
   +MS=10,0,1200,4800 selects V.32 bis 4800 bps fixed rate.

b. If <max_rate> is greater than the highest speed supported by the
   modulation specified by <mod>, the starting rate is the highest rate
   supported by the selected modulation.

   For example:
   +MS=10,0,2400,14400 selects V.32 bis 14400, 12000, 9600, 7200, 4800 bps.

c. To emulate issuance of the N0S37=x command sequence to select fixed mode
   operation, specify the <max_rate> and <min_rate> both to be the (same)
   requested speed, and <mod> to be the modulation for that speed.

   For example:

   +MS=11,0,16800,16800 selects V.34 16800 bps fixed mode
   (no comparable S37 command).
   +MS=10,0,12000,12000 selects V.32 bis 12000 bps fixed mode
   (same as N0S37=10).

For <automode> = 1 (automode enabled, i.e., automatically selected speed
and modulation): The modem connects at the highest possible rate in
accordance with V.8 bis/V.8, or V.32 bis Annex A if V.8 bis/V.8 is
not supported by the remote modem.

a. If <max_rate> is greater than the highest rate supported by the modulation
   specified by <mod>, the modem automodes down from the highest rate of the
   selected modulation. For example:
   +MS=10,1,1200,24000 selects automoding down from V.32 bis 14400 bps.

b. To emulate issuance of the N1S37=x sequence command, specify the
   modulation and the rate to start automoding down from using <mod> and
   <max_rate>, respectively. Set <min_rate> to 300 to allow automoding
   all the way down to V.21 300 bps. For example:

   +MS=11,1,300,16800 selects automode starting at V.34 16800 bps
   (no comparable S37 command).
   +MS=9,1,300,12000 selects automode starting at V.32 bis 12000 bps
   (same as N1S37=10).

3. <min_rate> is an optional number which specifies the lowest rate at
   which the modem may establish a connection. The value is decimal coded,
   in units of bps, e.g., 2400 specifies the lowest rate to be 2400 bps.
   The default is 300 for 300 bps.

4. <max_rate> is an optional number which specifies the highest rate at
   which the modem may establish a connection. The value is decimal coded,
   in units of bps, e.g., 14400 specifies the highest rate to be 14400 bps.
   The default is 28800 for 28800 bps.

5. <x_law> is an optional number which specifies the codec type.
   The options are:

   0 = m-Law
   1 = A-Law

   Note that ATZ will reset the <x_law> selection to 0 (m-Law).

6. <rb_signaling> is an optional number which enables or disables
   robbed bit signaling generation in a server modem or enables or disables
   robbed bit signaling detection in a client modem.
      The options are:

   0 = Robbed bit signaling generation (server modem )
       or detection (client modem) disabled (default)
   1 = Robbed bit signaling generation (server modem )
       or detection (client modem) enabled

   Note that ATZ will reset the <rb_signaling> selection to 0 (disabled).

Result Codes:

OK Valid subparameter string
ERROR Otherwise.

MNP 10 Commands
*Hn   Link Negotiation Speed
      Controls the connection speed for link negotiatons before upshift occurs
      between two MNP 10 modems. The parameter value, if valid, is written to
      S28 bits 6 and 7.
	*H0     Link negotiation occurs at the highest supported speed
		(default).
	*H1     Link negotiation occurs at 1200 b/s; used primarily for
		establishing cellular connections.
	*H2     Link negotiation occurs at 4800 b/s; used primarily to
		negotiate an MNP 10 connection on poor-quality phone lines.
		Do not use with )M1.

-Kn   MNP extended services
	-K0     Disables V.42 LAPM to MNP 10 conversion.
	-K1     Enables V.42 LAPM to MNP 10 conversion (default).
	-K2     Enables V.42 LAPM to MNP 10 conversion; inhibits MNP Extended
		Services initiation during V.42 LAPM answer mod detection
		phase.

)Mn   Enable or disable automatic adjustment of the transmit power level to
      accommodate the signaling requirements of cellular telephone equipment.
	)M0     Disables power level adjustment during MNP 10 link negotiation
		(defualt). Allows transmitter adjustment if cellular operation
		is requested by remote modem.
	)M1     Enables power level adjustment during MNP 10 link negotiation.
		Do not use with *H2.
       
-Qn   Enable fallback to V.22 bis/V.22
	-Q0     Disables fallback to 2400 b/s (V.22 bis) and 1200 b/s (V.22).
		Fallback is enabled only to 4800 b/s.
	-Q1     Enables fallback to 2400 b/s (V.22 bis) and 1200 b/s (V.22)
		(default).

-SEC=n Enable/Disable MNP10-EC
	-SEC0   Disable MNP10-EC.
	-SEC1,x Enable MNP10-EC with the transmit level of 0 to 30 
		(0 dB to -30 dB).

______________________________________________________________________________
2**AT Command Result Codes****************************************************

The modem responds to commands from the DTE and to activity on the line by
signaling to the DTE in the form of result codes. Display of these messages
is controlled by the Qn command. Q0 (the default) enables result codes. Q1
disables all result codes; no messages are returned to the DTE.

Two forms of each result code are available: the long form, a "verbose"
English-like response, and the short form, a "terse" numeric response. The
long-form code is preceded and terminated by a carriage return-line feed
sequence; it is enabled by V1 (the default). The short form is terminated by
a carriage return only, and there is no preceding sequence. It is enabled by
V0.

The Xn command controls monitoring of busy tone and dial tone and reporting
of DTE speed and line speed. The following table shows how the value of n in this command affects result code reporting. An X indicates that the message is
generated for that value of n. If the entry is blank, no message is generated
for that value of n. For certain messages and values of n, a less explicit
result code is substituted for the one listed; a numerical entry indicates
the short form of this substitute message.

Short (Terse)   Long (Verbose)
00              OK
01              CONNECT
02              RING
03              NO CARRIER
04              ERROR
05              CONNECT 1200
06              NO DIALTONE
07              BUSY
08              NO ANSWER
09              CONNECT 0600
10              CONNECT 2400
11              CONNECT 4800
12              CONNECT 9600
13              CONNECT 7200
14              CONNECT 12000
15              CONNECT 14400
16              CONNECT 19200
17              CONNECT 38400
18              CONNECT 57600
19              CONNECT 115200
22              CONNECT 75TX/1200RX
23              CONNECT 1200TX/75RX
24              DELAYED
32              BLACKLISTED
33              FAX
35              DATA
40              CARRIER 300
44              CARRIER 1200/75
45              CARRIER 75/1200
46              CARRIER 1200
47              CARRIER 2400
48              CARRIER 4800
49              CARRIER 7200
50              CARRIER 9600
51              CARRIER 12000
52              CARRIER 14400
53              CARRIER 16800
54              CARRIER 19200
55              CARRIER 21600
56              CARRIER 24000
57              CARRIER 26400
58              CARRIER 28800
59              CONNECT 16800
61              CONNECT 21600
62              CONNECT 24000
63              CONNECT 26400
64              CONNECT 28800
66              COMPRESSION: CLASS 5
67              COMPRESSION: V.42 bis
69              COMPRESSION: NONE
76              PROTOCOL: NONE
77              PROTOCOL: LAPM
78              CARRIER 31200 
79              CARRIER 33600 
80              PROTOCOL: ALT
81              PROTOCOL: ALT-CELLULAR
84              CONNECT 33600 
91              CONNECT 31200 
+F4             +FCERROR
150             CARRIER 32000
151             CARRIER 34000
152             CARRIER 36000
153             CARRIER 38000
154             CARRIER 40000
155             CARRIER 42000
156             CARRIER 44000
157             CARRIER 46000
158             CARRIER 48000
159             CARRIER 50000
160             CARRIER 52000
161             CARRIER 54000
162             CARRIER 56000
165             CONNECT 32000
166             CONNECT 34000
167             CONNECT 36000 
168             CONNECT 38000 
169             CONNECT 40000 
170             CONNECT 42000 
171             CONNECT 44000 
172             CONNECT 46000 
173             CONNECT 48000 
174             CONNECT 50000 
175             CONNECT 52000 
176             CONNECT 54000 
177             CONNECT 56000 

______________________________________________________________________________
3**S-Registers****************************************************************

Hayes-compatible modems store most of their configuration information in
8-bit status registers, or S-registers. For instance, S-register 7 (S7 for
short) determines the length of time the modem waits for carrier before going
back on-hook. You can modify many features of the modem's operation by
writing directly to these registers, using AT commands provided for this
purpose.

NOTE: Many AT commands that do not expressly invoke S-registers nonetheless
write to them. For instance, the Fn command, which selects line modulation,
writes to S31, and the &Tn test commands write to S16. For further examples,
see Appendix A.

The following table shows a summary of your modem's S-registers. Section 4 contains a detailed description of bit-mapped and coded S-registers. S-registers are volatile and are not preserved after a power-off or reset. However, the contents of the registers marked * in Table 7.1 can be saved permanently in nonvolatile RAM as part of a configuration profile, using the &Wn command. The S-register values of factory configuration profiles are stored permanently in the modem's ROM.

You can also configure most communications programs to issue a series of AT
commands, including those that write to S-registers, automatically as part of
a macro or command string associated with specified operations.

Writing to S-Registers

The command to write the value n to S-register r is
Atr=n  <ENTER>

Since the S-registers hold 8 bits, n must be an integer from 0 to 255.
Although for many S-registers the value of the separate bits is meaningful,
you cannot write directly to individual bits, and you must always enter
values as decimal numbers.

S-Register Summary
No.     Function                        Range   Units           Default
*0      Rings to auto-answer            0-255   rings           0
 1      Ring counter                    0-255   rings           0
*2      Escape character                0-255   ASCII           43
 3      Carriage-return character       0-127   ASCII           13
 4      Line-feed character             0-127   ASCII           10
 5      Backspace character             0-255   ASCII           8
*6      Wait time for dial tone         2-255   s               2
*7      Wait time for carrier           1-255   s               50
*8      Pause for dial delay modifier   0-255   s               2
*9      Carrier detect response time    1-255   0.1 s           6
*10     Carrier loss disconnect time    1-255   0.1 s           14
*11     DTMF tone duration              50-255  0.001 s         95
*12     Escape code guard time          0-255   0.02 s          50
 13     Reserved                        _       _               _
*14     General bit-mapped options      _       _               _
 15     Reserved                        _       _               _
 16     Test mode bit-mapped options    _       _               0
 17     Reserved                        _       _               _
*18     Test timer                      0-255   s               0
 19     Reserved                        _       _               _
 20     Reserved                        _       _               _
*21     V.24/general bit-mapped options _       _               _
*22     Speaker/Results bit-mapped opt. _       _               _
*23     General bit-mapped options      _       _               _
*24     Sleep inactivity timer          0-255   s               0
 25     Delay to DTR off                0-255   s or 0.01 s     5
 26     RTS-to-CTS delay                0-255   0.01 s          1
*27     General bit-mapped options      _       _               _
*28     General bit-mapped options_
*28     General bit-mapped options      -       -               0
 29     Flash dial modifier time        0-255   10 ms           70
 30     Disconnect inactivity timer     0-255   10 s            0
*31     General bit-mapped options      _       _               2
 32     XON character                   0-255   ASCII           17
 33     XOFF character                  0-255   ASCII           19
 34     Reserved                        _       _               _
 35     Reserved                        _       _               _
*36     LAPM failure control            _       _               7
*37     Line connection speed           _       _               0
 38     Delay before forced hangup      0-255   s               20
*39     Flow control bit-mapped options _       _               3
*40     General bit-mapped options      _       _               _
*41     General bit-mapped options      _       _               _
 42     Reserved                        _       _               _
 43     Reserved                        _       _               _
 44     Reserved                        _       _               _
 45     Reserved                        _       _               _
*46     Data compression control        _       _               _
 48     V.42 negotiation control        _       _               7
 82     LANM break control              _       _               _
 86     Call failure reason code        0-14    _               _
 91     PSTN transmit attenuation level 0-15    dBm             10
 92     Fax transit attenuation level   0-15    dBm             10
*95     Result code messages control    _       _               0

*Can be saved as part of a configuration profile.

For example, S0 determines the number of rings before the modem auto-answers.
The default is 0. To change the number of rings to 1, give the command

ATS0=1  <ENTER>

S7 determines the time that the modem waits for carrier. The default is 50,
in units of seconds. To change this value to 60 seconds, give the command

ATS7=60 <ENTER>

Pointing to a Default Register

The command ATSr points to S-register r as the default register. When this
has been done, AT=n writes the value n to S-register r.

The command to change the number of rings before auto-answering to 1 could
therefore also be given as

ATS0  <ENTER>

AT=1  <ENTER>

Reading S-Registers

The command

ATSr? <ENTER>

reports the value of S-register r. For instance:

ATS0?<ENTER>
000
OK

reads the value of S0. Like other AT commands, multiple read commands can be
given together:

ATS3?S5?<ENTER>
013
008
OK

______________________________________________________________________________
4**Bit-Mapped and Coded S-Registers*******************************************

This section describes the options coded in bit-mapped S-registers, and
certain other S-registers whose contents does not represent a measurement or
a character. For a summary of all S-registers, including registers 1 to 12,
see the last section.

S14    General bit-mapped options
	Bit 0  This bit is ignored. 
	Bit 1  Command echo (En)
		0 = Disabled (E0)
		1 = Enabled (E1) (default)
	Bit 2  Quiet mode (Qn)
		0 = Send result codes (Q0) (default)
		1 = Do not send result codes (Q1)
	Bit 3  Result codes (Vn)
		0 = Numeric (V0) 
		1 = Verbose (V1) (default)
	Bit 4  Reserved
	Bit 5  Tone (T)/Pulse (P)
		0 = Tone (T) (default)
		1 = Pulse (P)
	Bit 6  Reserved
	Bit 7  Originate/Answer
	       0 = Answer
	       1 = Originate (default)

S16    General bit-mapped test options
	Bit 0  Local analog loopback
	       0 = Disabled (default)
	       1 = Enabled (&T1)
	Bit 1  Not used
	Bit 2  Local digital loopback
	       0 = Disabled (default)
	       1 = Enabled (&T3)
	Bit 3  Remote digital loopback (RDL) status
	       0 = Modem not in RDL (default)
	       1 = RDL in progress
	Bit 4  RDL requested (AT&T6)
	       0 = RDL not requested (default)
	       1 = RDL requested (&T6)
	Bit 5  RDL with self-test
	       0 = Disabled (default)
	       1 = Enabled (&T7)
	Bit 6  Local analog loopback (LAL) with self-  test
	       0 = Disabled (default)
	       1 = Enabled (&T8)
	Bit 7  Not used

S21     V.24/general bit-mapped options
	Bit 0  Set by &Jn command but ignored  otherwise.
	       0 = &J0 (default)
	       1 = &J1
	Bit 1  Reserved
	Bit 2  CTS behavior (&Rn)
	       0 = CTS always on (&R0)
	       1 = CTS tracks RTS (&R1) (default)
	Bit 3,4 DTR behavior (&Dn)
	       0 = &D0 selected (default)
	       1 = &D1 selected
	       2 = &D2 selected
	       3 = &D3 selected
	Bit 5  RLSD (DCD) behavior (&Cn)
	       0 = &C0 selected
	       1 = &C1 selected (default)
	Bit 6  DSR behavior (&Sn)
	       0 = &S0 selected (default)
	       1 = &S1 selected
	Bit 7  Long space disconnect (Yn)
	       0 = Y0 (default)
	       1 = Y1

S22   Speaker/results bit-mapped options
	Bit 0,1 Speaker volume (Ln)
	       0 = Off (L0)
	       1 = Low (L1) (default)
	       2 = Medium (L2)
	       3 = High (L3)
	Bit 2,3 Speaker control (Mn)
	       0 = Disabled (M0)
	       1 = Off on carrier (M1) (default)
	       2 = Always on (M2)
	       3 = On during handshake (M3)
	Bit 4,5,6 Limit result codes (Xn)
	       0=X0,  4=X1,  5=X2,  6=X3,  7=X4 (default)
	Bit 7  Reserved

S23   General bit-mapped options
	Bit 0  Grant remote digital loopback (RDL)
	       0 = RDL not allowed (&T5)
	       1 = RDL allowed (&T4) (default)
	Bit 1,2,3      Assumed DTE rate
	       0 = 0-300 b/s
	       1 = 600 b/s
	       2 = 1200 b/s
	       3 = 2400 b/s
	       4 = 4800 b/s
	       5 = 9600 b/s
	       6 = 19200 b/s
	       7 = 38400 b/s or higher (default)
	Bit 4,5  Assumed DTE parity
	       0 = even
	       1 = not used
	       2 = odd
	       3 = none (default)
	Bit 6,7  Guard tone (&Gn)
	       0 = None (&G0) (default)
	       1 = None (&G1)
	       2 = 1800 Hz (&G2)

S27  Bit-mapped options
	Bit 0-3   Reserved
	Bit 4,5 Internal clock select (&Xn)
	       0 = Internal clock (&X0) (default)
	       1 = External clock (&X1)
	       2 = Slave clock (&X2)
	Bit 6  CCITT/Bell mode select (Bn)
	       0 = CCITT mode (B0)
	       1 = Bell mode (B1) (default)
	Bit 7  Reserved

S28    Bit-mapped options
	       Default: 0.
	Bit 0  V.23 split speed (\Wn)
	       0 = Disabled (\W0) (default)
	       1 = Enabled (\W1)
	Bit 1  V.23 split-speed direction 
	       0 = 75Tx/1200Rx (%F1) (default)
	       1 = 1200Tx/75Rx (%F2)
	Bit 2  Reserved (always 0)
	Bit 3,4 Pulse dialing (&Pn)
	       0 = 39/61 make/break ratio at 10 pulses per second (&P0)
			 (default)
	       1 = 33/67 make/break ratio at 10 pps (&P1)
	       2 = 39/61 make/break ratio at 20 pps (&P2)
	       3 = 33/67 make/break ratio at 20 pps (&P3)
	Bit 5-7 Reserved

S31   Bit-mapped options
	Bit 0  Single line connect message control (\Vn)
	       0 = Message controlled by S95, Wn, Vn (\V0) (default)
	       1 = Single line connect message (\V1)
	Bit 1  Controls auto line-speed detection (Nn)
	       0 = Disabled (N0)
	       1 = Enabled (N1) (default)
	Bit 2,3 Controls error correction progress messages (Wn)
	       0 = DTE speed only (W0) (default)
	       1 = Full reporting (W1)
	       2 = DCE speed only (W2)
	Bit 4-7 Reserved

S36    LAPM failure control (ECC models only)
	Bit 0-2 Indicates what should happen upon LAPM failure. These
		fallback options are initiated immediately upon connection if
		S48=128. If an invalid number is entered, the number is
		accepted into the register, but S36 acts as if the default
		value had been entered.
		0 = Modem disconnects.
		1 = Modem stays on-line and a direct mode connection is
		    established.
		2 = Reserved.
		3 = Modem stays on-line and a normal mode connection is
		    established.
		4 = An MNP connection is attempted and if it fails, the modem
		    disconnects.
		5 = An MNP connection is attempted and if it fails, a direct
		    mode connection is established.
		6 = Reserved.
		7 = MNP connection attempted; if it fails, normal mode
		    connection is established (default).
	Bit 3-7 Reserved

S37     Desired line connection speed
	Bit 0-4 Desired line connection speed. This is interlinked with the
		Fn command. If an invalid number is entered, the number is
		accepted into the register, but S37 acts as if the default
		value had been entered.
	       0 = Attempt auto-mode connect (F0) (default)
	       1-3 = Attempt to connect at 300 b/s (F1).
	       4 = Reserved.
	       5 = Attempt to connect at 1200 b/s (F4).
	       6 = Attempt to connect at 2400 b/s (F5).
	       7 = Attempt to connect at V.23 (F3)
	       8 = Attempt to connect at 4800 b/s (F6).
	       9 = Attempt to connect at 9600 b/s (F8).
	       10 = Attempt to connect at 12000 b/s (F9).
	       11 = Attempt to connect at 14400 b/s (F10).
	       12 = Attempt to connect at 7200 b/s (F7).
	Bit 5-7 Reserved

S39  Flow control (&Kn)
	Bit 0-2 Status of command options
	       0 = No flow control (&K0)
	       3 = RTS/CTS (&K3) (default)
	       4 = XON/XOFF (&K4)
	       5 = Transparent XON (&K5)
	       6 = Both methods (&K6)
	Bit 3-7 Reserved

S40   General bit-mapped options
	Bit 0,1 MNP extended services (-Kn)
	       0 = Disable extended services (-K0) (default)
	       1 = Enable extended services (-K1)
	       2 = Enable extended services (-K2)
	Bit 2  Reserved
	Bit 3-5 Break Handling (\Kn)
	       0 = \K0
	       1 = \K1
	       2 = \K2
	       3 = \K3
	       4 = \K4
	       5 = \K5 (default)
	Bit 6-7 MNP block size (\An)
	       0 = 64 chars (\A0)
	       1 = 128 chars (\A1) (default)
	       2 = 192 chars (\A2)
	       3 = 256 chars (\A3)

S41     General bit-mapped options
	Bit 1,0 Compression selection (%Cn)
	       0 = Disabled (%C0)
	       1 = MNP 5 (%C1)
	       2 = V.42 bis (%C2)
	       3 = MNP 5 and V.42 bis (%C3) (default)
	Bit 6,2 Auto retrain and fallback/fall-forward (%En)
	      00 = Retrain and fallback/fall-forward disabled (%E0) (default)
	      01 = Retrain enabled (%E1)
	      10 = Fallback/fall-forward enabled (%E2)
	Bit 3-7 Reserved

S48    V.42 negotiation action
       The V.42 negotiation process determines the capabilities of the
       remote modem. When the capabilities of the remote modem are known
       and negotiation is unnecessary, this process can be bypassed if
       desired. Range: 0, 7, or 128. If an invalid number is entered,
       it is accepted into the register, but S48 acts as if 128 had been
       entered. Default: 7.
       0       Disable negotiation, bypass the detection and negotiation
	       phases, and proceed with LAPM.
       7       Enable negotiation. (default). 
       128     Disable negotiation; bypass the detection and negotiation
	       phases; and proceed at once with the fallback action
	       specified in S36. Can be used to force MNP.

S86     Call failure reason code
	When the modem issues a NO CARRIER result code, a value is written to
	this S-register to help determine the reason for the failed
	connection. S86 records the first event that contributes to a NO
	CARRIER message. Range: 0-14.
	0      Normal disconnect, no error occurred.
	4      Loss of carrier.
	5      V.42 negotiation failed to detect an error-correction modem
	       at the other end.
	9      The modems could not find a common protocol.
	12     Normal disconnect initiated by the remote modem.
	13     Remote modem does not respond after 10 re-transmissions of
	       the same message.
	14     Protocol violation.

S95     Extended result codes
	A bit set to 1 in this register enables the corresponding result code
	regardless of the Wn setting. Default: 0.
	Bit 0  CONNECT result code indicates DCE speed instead of DTE speed.
	Bit 1  Append /ARQ to CONNECT rate result code in error-correction
	       mode
	Bit 2  Enable CARRIER rate result code
	Bit 3  Enable PROTOCOL identifier result code
	Bit 4  Reserved
	Bit 5  Enable COMPRESSION type result code
	Bit 6  Reserved
	Bit 7  Reserved

______________________________________________________________________________
5**Error Correction, Data Compression, and Flow Control***********************

Your modem is compatible with the latest standards for error correction and
data compression. This chapter explains basic concepts of error correction,
data compression, and flow control.

Error Correction

Your modem supports the CCITT V.42 standard for error correction, including
LAPM (link access procedure for modems) and MNP 4.
In ordinary asynchronous transmission, each eight-bit sequence of data is
framed by a start bit and a stop bit. In an error-correction protocol, the
transmitting modem strips off the start and stop bits and divides the data
into larger blocks. (The size of the blocks can vary according to the amount
of data and the quality of the connection, and can be as great as 256 bytes.)
For each block it calculates a polynomial checksum, and transmits both the
block and the checksum synchronously.

The receiving modem must also be an error-correcting modem. It recalculates
the checksum and compares it with the value it received. If they match, the
block is considered good; if they do not match, the receiving modem asks for
the block to be retransmitted. The chance that the checksum will accidentally
match a corrupted block is extremely small_so small that in practice the
transmission can be considered 100-percent error-free.

The most reliable and efficient error-control protocol is CCITT V.42, but
your modem can also use MNP (Microcom Networking Protocol) Level 4, or it can
fall back to MNP 4 or to a non-error-corrected transmission. The error-control
mode is selected by the \N command.

Normal Mode

Normal, asynchronous non-error-correcting mode is used to communicate with
non-error-corrected modems. It is selected by \N0. Auto-reliable mode also
falls back to this mode if error correction is not possible.

Normal mode includes speed buffering, so the local DTE-to-modem speed and the
modem-to-modem line speed can differ. (This is desirable to ensure efficient
data transmission, as discussed under "Flow Control" later in this chapter.)

Direct Mode

Direct mode is similar to normal mode, except that no speed buffering takes
place. DTE speed and line speed must therefore be the same. This mode is
selected by \N1.

Reliable Mode

"Reliable" means an error-correcting mode. In this mode, selected by \N2,
the originating modem first attempts a V.42 LAPM connection (by looking for
the LAPM character during modem handshaking). If the attempt fails, because
the answering modem does not support V.42 or is set for the wrong mode, or
because the line quality is extremely bad, it falls back to an MNP connection
(again by looking for MNP characters).

If the MNP connection also fails (for similar reasons), the originating modem
hangs up. You should therefore use this mode only when error correction is
essential and you are certain that the remote modem supports V.42 or MNP.
Otherwise auto-reliable mode is a better choice.

Auto-Reliable Mode

Auto-reliable mode is identical to reliable mode, except that if the modem
fails to make a reliable connection it falls back to normal speed-buffered
mode. For most users, this is the most flexible and convenient mode. It is
selected by \N3, and is the default error-correcting mode.

V.42 Mode

The originating modem attempts to negotiate a V.42 LAPM error-correction
connection. If it fails, it hangs up without falling back to MNP or to normal
mode. This mode is selected by \N4. Like reliable mode, this mode should be
used only when error correction is essential and you are certain that the
remote modem supports V.42.

MNP Mode

The originating modem attempts to negotiate an MNP error-correction
connection. If it fails, it hangs up without falling back to normal mode.
This mode is selected by \N5. Like reliable mode, this mode should be used
only when error correction is essential and you are certain that the remote
modem supports MNP.

**Software Error-Correction Protocols**

V.42 and MNP error correction are performed by the modem hardware and
firmware. Since data integrity is essential for executable files, most file
transfer protocols, such as XMODEM, used with communications software also
incorporate error-correcting features. These protocols operate similarly to
V.42 and MNP, except that the block length is usually shorter and the
checksum may not be so robust.

When used with an error-correcting modem, software error correction is
redundant and adds overhead, reducing the efficiency of the transfer. On
connections where hardware performs the error correction, you may want to
use a non-error-correcting file transfer protocol such as YMODEM-G or IMODEM.
The ZMODEM protocol offers other desirable features, such as resumption of
an interrupted file transfer, and imposes only a small penalty for error
correction; it may be a good choice when you cannot be sure of achieving a
hardware-corrected connection.

**Data Compression**

Many forms of data, such as text, word-processing files, spreadsheet. or
database files, are highly redundant_that is, they contain repeated
characters, or sequences of characters that recur frequently. By removing
the redundancy, such data can be encoded in a shorter form for transmission
over a telephone line and then reconstructed at the remote site, effectively
raising the data throughput of the connection. Like error correction,
hardware data compression must be supported by modems at both ends of the
link.

Executable files usually contain much less redundancy and benefit less from
compression techniques. Files that have already been compressed by an
archiving program, such as PKZIP for DOS or StuffIt on the Macintosh, allow
little or no further compression. Files on computer bulletin boards and on-
line services are often stored in this compressed form.

Your modem supports two data compression standards, V.42 bis and MNP 5. V.42
bis generally achieves greater compression, and has an additional advantage
over MNP 5: it does not attempt to compress already-compressed files. MNP 5
tries to compress all files; if the file is already compressed, this attempt
adds processing overhead, and in some cases actually increases the length of
the file (because the protocol must add header information).

Data compression requires simultaneous error correction, since corruption of
even one bit could destroy an entire block of compressed data. V.42 bis data
compression can be used only in conjunction with V.42 error correction.
MNP 5 error compression can be used only in conjunction with MNP 4 error
correction.

Data compression is controlled through the %C command. The default, %C3, is
to enable both V.42 bis and MNP 5 data compression; the choice depends on the
type of error correction the modem negotiates. %C1 enables only MNP 5, and
%C2 enables only V.42 bis; data compression is used only if the modem
negotiates the corresponding error correction protocol. %C0 disables data
compression altogether.

**Flow Control**

During a data transfer, the two modems at the ends of the connection are
constantly exchanging data. A personal computer used as a DTE, on the other
hand, may also be reading from or writing to disk, and its microprocessor
has many other tasks to perform simultaneously. The speed with which it can
send data to or receive data from the modem therefore varies.

Obtaining Maximum Throughput

If the maximum data transfer rate between DTE and modem (the serial port
speed or DTE speed) is set to the same value as the data transfer rate
between the local modem and the remote modem (the modem speed or line speed),
there will be times when the DTE is unable to send data to or receive data
from the modem as fast as the modem can process it. The modem therefore fails
to achieve its rated throughput. Since your modem can transmit uncompressed
data as fast as either 14,400 or 28,800 b/s, for maximum throughput you
should set your DTE speed (usually controlled by the communications software)
to 38,400 b/s (or higher if you are using data compression).

In its default configuration, your modem permits DTE speed and line speed to
differ (\J0). To force the DTE speed to match the line speed, use \J1.

Data Buffers

Of course, if the DTE speed is higher than the line speed, the DTE may send
data to the modem faster than the modem can process it. To deal with this
situation, the modem maintains transmit data buffers in RAM that temporarily
store the extra characters. (The data buffers are also used for error
correction and data compression.)

At any DTE speed, there may be times when the modem sends data to the DTE
faster than the DTE can accept it (for instance, if the DTE is busy writing
to disk). The 16550 UART chip, found in many personal computers, buffers
data received on the serial port, which helps to make high-speed downloads
reliable; this chip is desirable for high-speed data communications.
Communications software may also maintain its own data buffers.

No matter how large a buffer is, however, it can overflow, and if that
happens data is lost. The DTE and the modem must therefore have some way to
stop the flow of data before the buffers overflow. There are two types of
flow control: hardware and software.

NOTE: Modem-to-modem flow control is handled by either the hardware error-
correction protocol or the file transfer protocol.

Hardware Flow Control

Hardware flow control uses the RS-232 RTS (Ready to Send) and CTS (Clear to
Send) signals. If the modem's transmit data buffer is about to overflow, it
drops CTS, signaling the DTE to halt its flow of data. When the buffer is
ready to accept more data, the modem raises CTS and the flow resumes.

In the same way, if the UART's receive buffer or the communications software's
buffer is full, the software can drop characters, XON and XOFF are treated as commands by a modem in data mode, and are ordinarily not passed along in the data stream to the remote modem. XOFF is the signal to the modem from the DTE or the DTE from the modem to stop data flow; it is normally ASCII 19d (13h), which is equivalent to v-S, but it can be changed through S33. XON is the signal to resume data flow; it is normally ASCII 17d (11h), which is equivalent to v-Q, but it can be changed through S32.

The drawback to software flow control is that the XON and XOFF characters may
unintentionally appear in binary data, aborting a file transfer.

Software flow control is enabled by &K4. &K6 enables both hardware and
software flow control. &K0 disables all flow control. Software flow control
must also be enabled in your communications software.

______________________________________________________________________________
6**Fax Operation**************************************************************

To send and receive fax messages over your modem, you need a personal
computer and fax software. When you receive a fax message, the modem performs
protocol handshaking with the remote fax machine or fax modem and passes the
incoming data to the fax software, which decodes it to a bit-mapped image
and stores the image as a disk file. When you send a message, the fax
software codes a file as a bit-mapped image and passes the corresponding
data to the modem, which sends it out over the telephone line to a remote
fax machine or fax modem.

EIA Class 1 and Class 2 fax commands are a set of extended AT commands
defined by the EIA/TIA (Electronic Industries Association-Telecommunications
Industry Association) for controlling a fax modem over the EIA RS-232 serial
interface. These commands and responses are described briefly in the table below. Except for the standard AT commands D and A to originate and answer
a call, all fax commands begin with +F. The user does not normally need to
understand the details of these commands, which are hidden by the fax
software interface.

Fax Class 1 & 2 Commands
Command                 Function

+FCLASS=                Service class

		Fax Class 1 Commands
+FTS=n                  Stop transmission and wait
+FRS=n                  Receive silence
+FTM=n                  Transmit data
+FRM=n                  Receive data
+FTH=n                  Transmit data with HDLC framing
+FRH=n                  Receive data with HDLC framing

		Class 2 Action Commands
D                       Originate a call
A                       Answer a call
+FDT                    Data transmission
+FET=N                  Transmit page punctuation
+FDR                    Begin or continue phase C receive data
+FK                     Session termination

		Class 2 DCE Responses
+FCON                   Facsimile connection response
+FDCS:                  Report current session
+FDIS                   Report remote identification
+FCFR                   Indicate confirmation to receive
+FTSI:                  Report the transmit station ID
+FCSI:                  Report the called station ID
+FPTS:                  Page transfer status
+FET:                   Post page message response
+FHNG                   Call termination with status

		Class 2 Session Parameters
+FMFR?                  Identify manufacturer
+FMDL?                  Identify model
+FREV?                  Identify revision
+FDCC=                  DCE capabilities parameters
+FDIS=                  Current sessions parameters
+FDCS=                  Current session results
+FLID=                  Local ID string
+FCR                    Capability to receive
+FPTS=                  Page transfer status
+FCR=                   Capability to receive
+FAE                    Adaptive answer
+FBUF?                  Buffer size (read only)
+FPHCTO                 Phase C time-out
+FAXERR                 Fax error value
+FBOR                   Phase C data bit order

______________________________________________________________________________
7**Diagnostic Tests***********************************************************
Your modem offers several diagnostic tests that you can perform to test its
operation, its link to your DTE, and its link to another modem:

	Local analog loopback

	Local digital loopback

	Remote digital loopback

These tests can help you locate and isolate a failure in the local modem, a
remote modem, the serial interface, the telephone connection, or the computer
and communications software.

All tests are initiated by AT&Tn commands entered from the keyboard of a
terminal or a computer running communications software in terminal mode.

The modem should be off-line and in direct, unbuffered mode (&Q0 or &M0)
before beginning the test. It is a good idea to start by typing

	AT  <ENTER>

to test the operation of the terminal or communications software, the
integrity of its link to the modem, and the modem's ability to respond to
commands. If everything is working, the modem responds

	OK

Test Timer

The value of the S18 register determines the duration of a test in seconds,
from 0 to 255. It is usually convenient to specify the value of this timer
as part of the test command.

The default for S18 is 0, meaning that the test runs indefinitely. To
terminate an indefinite test (or to terminate a timed test before it is
over), type

	AT&T0  <ENTER>

This command terminates the test in progress.

Alternatively, you can type

	ATH  <ENTER>

to hang up.

Self-Test

Some tests include a self-test, which is simply a test pattern generated by
the modem and checked for errors. If you do not run the self-test, you have
to enter test data yourself at the terminal.

Single-Modem Tests

There are two tests you can perform without the aid of another modem: local
analog loopback with and without self-test.

Local Analog Loopback

In the local analog loopback test, digital data from the DTE is sent to the
modem's transmitter, modulated into analog form, looped back to the modem's
receiver, demodulated, and returned to the DTE. This test therefore tests the
modem, the DTE, and the connections between them.

This test is initiated by the command

	ATS18=duration&T1  <ENTER>

where duration is the length of time you want the test to run. If instead you
type simply

	AT&T1  <ENTER>

then the length of the test is determined by the current value of the S18
timer. If a connection exists when you issue the test command, the modem
terminates it and begins the test.

When the test begins you see a message giving the connect rate.

Type any characters. To pass the test, the modem should echo them back to the
screen exactly as you typed them. (You see the characters only once, not
twice.).

Local Analog Loopback with Self-Test

This test is identical to the previous one, except that the modem itself
generates the data, which you can see on-screen as printable ASCII
characters. The command to begin the test is

	ATS18=duration&T8 <ENTER>

When the test is terminated by expiration of S18 or the &T0 or H command,
the modem reports the number of errors detected to the DTE. For the modem to
pass the test, this number should be zero.

Two-Modem Tests

The remaining tests require a second modem (called the remote modem, although
it does not have to be far away from the test modem, only connected to it
through a telephone line).

Local Digital Loopback

In the local digital loopback test, the local modem receives analog data from
the remote modem, demodulates it into digital form, loops it back to its own
transmitter, remodulates it into analog form, and retransmits it to the
remote modem. This test therefore tests your local modem, the telephone line,
and the remote modem and DTE (presumed to be good). The remote modem does
not need to have any special capabilities, but you need the cooperation of
someone at the remote site.

To perform this test, establish a connection with another modem, and then
give the command

	ATS18=duration&T3  <ENTER>
	
to begin local digital loopback. The actual testing is done at the remote
site: any characters typed on the remote keyboard should be echoed back to
the remote screen exactly as they were typed.

There is no self-test available for this test.

Remote Digital Loopback

The remote digital loopback test can be performed with an unattended remote
modem, but the remote modem must have CCITT V.54 remote digital loopback
capability.

In this test, the local modem sends a remote digital loopback request to the
remote modem. If the remote modem has this capability and it is configured
to accept the request, it establishes a connection. The local modem modulates
digital data from its local DTE into analog data and transmits it to the
remote modem. There it is received, demodulated into digital form, looped
back to the remote transmitter, remodulated into analog form, and
retransmitted to the local modem. The local modem in turn demodulates it and
sends the resulting digital data to the local DTE. This test therefore tests
your local DTE and modem, the connections between them, the telephone line,
and the remote modem (presumed to be good).

The command for this test is

	ATS18=duration&T6  <ENTER>

As in the local analog loopback test, all characters you type at the local
keyboard should be echoed perfectly back to the screen. The modem remains
on-line after the test terminates.

By default, a V.54-compliant modem is configured to accept requests for
remote digital loopback from another modem. Requests can be denied by
entering the command

	AT&T5  <ENTER>

and re-enabled by

	AT&T4  <ENTER>

Remote Digital Loopback with Self-Test

This test is identical to the previous one, except that the local modem
itself generates the data, which you can see on-screen as printable ASCII
characters. The command to begin the test is

	ATS18=duration&T7 <ENTER>

When the test is terminated by expiration of S18 or the &T0 or H command,
the modem reports the number of errors detected to the DTE. For the modem to
pass the test, this number should be zero. The modem remains on-line after
the test terminates.
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Download Driver Pack

How To Update Drivers Manually

After your driver has been downloaded, follow these simple steps to install it.

  • Expand the archive file (if the download file is in zip or rar format).

  • If the expanded file has an .exe extension, double click it and follow the installation instructions.

  • Otherwise, open Device Manager by right-clicking the Start menu and selecting Device Manager.

  • Find the device and model you want to update in the device list.

  • Double-click on it to open the Properties dialog box.

  • From the Properties dialog box, select the Driver tab.

  • Click the Update Driver button, then follow the instructions.

Very important: You must reboot your system to ensure that any driver updates have taken effect.

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